Advertisement
ontarionewswatch.com NEWSROOM

                                                         As Trump Endangers U.S. Water, 

                                       Canada Must Protect Its Own Before America Comes Knocking

 

By Terri Chu

President Drumpf has made clear that he cares not one wit for environmental protection.  He wants to strengthen businesses and let them be free to do business in a free market environment.  Judging by Beijing’s air pollution, it should be the best city in the world to live in, according to his standards. 

This new administration plans to make America great again by going back to a time when an Ohio river was so polluted it could be set on fire. Within a week of taking office, Trump has cleared the path to endanger drinking water supplies in North Dakota and dealt a blow to the EPA.  Now, a Florida congressman is proposing a bill to abolish the EPA altogether.  If the Florida congressman is successful, there’s not much left protecting American drinking water for future use.  Measures to protect coal mining debris from being dumped into streams have also been rescinded.  Water has never been more stressed in the United States. 

Canada should not wait until our neighbours are so thirsty they come knocking.  We must strengthen our laws to protect our own freshwater resources and make sure the shared resources, like the Great Lakes, are protected. If the EPA falls, there will be very little we can do to protect the common bodies of water, but we can protect those that are in Canada. Moreover, we must prohibit the bulk export of water. 

These laws need to be put in place now, with foresight, and not as a reactionary measure when the time comes.  Canada must take steps to preserve what resources are left, both above and below ground. 

Water usage must be better regulated than it is now, and bottling companies and golf courses should not be allowed to draw water millions of litres of water for a pittance. 

Bottling Canadian water should be banned, period.  We have the cleanest, safest water in the world flowing freely from our taps, and there is absolutely no reason it needs to be put into a plastic bottle, with very little safety oversight, and sold at substantial markups.  In the very least, the plastic waste generated from the process needs to be taxed heavily and its disposal not subsidized by taxpayers. Labatt demonstrated during the Fort MacMurray fires how quickly it can bottle water in times of emergency.  Aluminum is at least recyclable.  There really is no need to pollute the planet with waste water bottles. 

The furor Nestle caused over outbidding a municipality for water access is a drop in the bucket compared to the need to keep 350 million people hydrated after they have devastated their own water supplies.

Water is a tricky issue, as the jurisdictional line between provincial and federal responsibilities is murky.  By comparison, the EPA provided strong legal protection for drinking water in the United States.  As those protections fade, Canada must be prepared to protect our own resources, no matter how abundant they might seem now. 

We are Canadians, we open our doors to those in need, but that does not include those who recklessly destroy their own resources in the name of profits, then come marching after ours.

Being environmental stewards means we also know when to say no. 

 

Terri Chu is an expert in energy systems, with a Masters in Engineering specializing in urban energy systems. Terri founded the grassroots organization "Why Should I Care", a not for profit dedicated to engaging people on issues of public policy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted date : February 05, 2017
ontarionewswatch.com NEWSROOM
The Liberals want a high-speed rail system for Southwestern Ontario - an idea as old as Bill Davis' Conservative government. Randall White explores the concept.
May 29, 2017
The Inquiry is off to a slow and controversial start. What is holding it up? Mahoney, Capobianco and Parkin on what it will take to succeed.
May 25, 2017
"There may be trouble in River City" when it comes to the Ontario PCs. Anger inside the party and rumblings of a new movement could affect the leader's election chances.
May 24, 2017
The auditor is suggesting the internal culture of the RCMP is so dysfunctional it requires civilian oversight. Mahoney, Capobianco and Parkin on whether that's a good idea.
May 17, 2017
A Liberal government led by a woman in BC, up for re-election after holding power for more than 15 years. Sound familiar? Randall White on whether there are lessons for Kathleen Wynne.
May 11, 2017
The Liberals are moving left as we near the 2018 election - a reprise of the last provincial and federal campaigns. Will it work a third time? Mahoney, Capobianco and Parkin debate.
May 10, 2017
This past Earth day, the planet surpassed 400 parts per million (ppm) of CO2 in the atmosphere. Terri Chu laments that as long as polluting is cheap, it will continue unabated.
May 08, 2017
The Defence Minister is accused of lying when he described himself as "the architect" of a major offensive during Afghanistan war. Should he step down? Mahoney, Capobianco and Parkin debate.
May 03, 2017
Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne's approval ratings have plummeted a year ahead of next year's Ontario election. But not so fast, says Peter Shurman - don't count Wynne out yet.
April 28, 2017
Hamilton, Thunder Bay and Lindsay will be the pilot sites for the Basic Income Project for 4,000 lower-income people. Is it a good idea? Mahoney, Capobianco and Parkin on that.
April 27, 2017
If Ontario really does put Canada first, it has to be a big supporter of the new Canadian Free Trade Agreement scheduled to take effect July 1st. Randall White delves into the details.
April 22, 2017
It's been thrown around for everything from fat paycheques (read Bombardier) to tax credits for creating jobs. Brad James thinks it's time to give the old phrase a rest once and for all.
April 21, 2017